Documents

Annual Report 2015-2016 thumbnail

Annual Report 2015-2016

  • Published: September 19, 2016

In this report, the GNRC activities carried out in 2015/2016, are summarized. I thank all those who have supported our work across the world. Children are the future, and hope for a more peaceful world.

As we prepare for the GNRC 5th Forum to take place in May 9th, 10th and 11th 2017 in Panama City, Panama – a Forum that will exclusively address the issue of violence against children, I welcome you to join the GNRC members around the world in ending violence against children.

التقرير السنوي في اللغة الإنجليزية thumbnail

التقرير السنوي في اللغة الإنجليزية

2014-2015

  • Published: May 20, 2016

The 2014/2015 annual report presents a summary of key activities implemented by the GNRC members in some 40 countries around the world. GNRC focused on Ethics Education for Children, Prayer and Action for Children, End Child Poverty as well as Peacebuilding to safeguard and protect the environment that children live in.

Once again I thank all those who have supported our work across the globe with the aim of achieving a better and peaceful world for children. I invite all of you to join hands in making this world a better place for all children.

GNRC Forth Forum Report (الإنجليزية) thumbnail

GNRC Forth Forum Report (الإنجليزية)

  • Published: May 20, 2016

The Fourth Forum of the Global Network of Religions for Children (GNRC) was held from 16th - 18th June 2012 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, under the theme of “Ending Poverty, Enriching Children: INSPIRE. ACT. CHANGE.” Four hundred and seventy (470) participants from 64 different countries around the world, including 49 children and young people, engaged in spirited discussions focused on what the world’s faith communities can do together to end child poverty.

The members of the GNRC Fourth Forum Organizing Committee, chaired by Dr. Mustafa Ali, wisely guided the preparations for the forum, and their excellent planning was put into action by the Local Hosting Committee, chaired by Sr. Jean Pruitt. Countless others are deserving of our profound gratitude for making the forum a success, not the least of which are the Fourth Forum Co-patrons H.E. Ambassador Dr. Salim Ahmed Salim and His Lordship Bishop Dr. Method Kilaini, the African Council of Religious Leaders, and the Forum Secretary General Abubakar Kabwogi. All of the staff and the wonderful volunteers worked very hard to ensure our time together in Dar es Salaam, the “Haven of Peace,” would lead to a wonderful outcome.

Shining Ever Brighter (الإنجليزية) thumbnail

Shining Ever Brighter (الإنجليزية)

  • Published: May 20, 2016

It was in February 1945, very near the end of World War II, that I had the great fortune to meet Rev. Kohei Miyamoto, whom Myochikai members revere as Daionshi, or great spiritual leader. Not long after, I began a new life with the Daionshi and his wife, Rev. Mitsu Miyamoto. At that time, they were poor and unknown ordinary people, but I was deeply impressed by their passion and devotion to the Buddhist faith.

The Daionshi was totally selfless, free from complaints and frustrations, and constantly exuded a deep gratitude for all things. During the severe bombing of Tokyo near the end of the war, he kept a lonely vigil at the head temple of the religious organization to which he belonged. Despite suffering burns in the explosions, he stayed there, risking his life to protect the spiritual treasures in the building. This kind of unwavering faith—and putting it into practice—is the essence of the spirit of Myochikai.

CRAVE Interfaith Resource Guide thumbnail

CRAVE Interfaith Resource Guide

  • Published: August 04, 2018

The Community Resilience Against Violent Extremism (CRAVE) is an interfaith peace-building program whose objective is to prevent violent extremism and transform conflicts in which mostly young people are involved in the Eastern Africa region.


The CRAVE program was launched in 2014 by the members of the Global Network of Religions for Children (GNRC) from Eastern Africa region with support from local and international partners.

GNRC ANNUAL REPORT 2018 – 2019 thumbnail

GNRC ANNUAL REPORT 2018 – 2019

  • Published: December 31, 2019

Guided by the 10 Panama Commitments on Ending Violence Against Children made during the GNRC 5th Forum held in May 2017, remarkable efforts have been made by members of the Global Network of Religions for Children (GNRC) in the year 2018 – 2019.

GNRC’s grassroots efforts are inspired by diverse faith practices and a strong belief that every child is priceless in dignity and deserve to grow up safe and sound. Violence against children is one of the gravest challenges facing the world today, but it does not receive attention commensurate with its scope, scale and nature.

Violence is the leading cause of death and injury of children in the world. The evidence is overwhelming. UNICEF reports that in every five minutes, a child is killed in a violent act. About 1 billion of the 2.2 billion children around the world endure different forms of physical and sexual violence, irrespective of ethnicity, nationality, race, religion or income levels. In 2012 alone, 95,000 children between the ages of 15-19 died as a result of violence.

World Day Against Child Labour, 2020 — Search For Justice thumbnail

World Day Against Child Labour, 2020 — Search For Justice

  • Published: June 12, 2020

Child Rights organizations working for promotion and protection of children’s rights strongly urged provincial government to take all possible measures to implement available legal framework to address the deep-rooted issue of child labour. This was demanded during an online roundtable arranged by Search For Justice to mark World Day Against Child Labour. World Day Against Child Labour 2020 is focusing on the impact of crisis on child labour.

The COVID-19 health pandemic and the resulting economic and labour market shock are having a huge impact on people’s lives and livelihoods. Unfortunately, children are often the first to suffer. The crisis can push millions of vulnerable children into child labour. Already, there are an estimated 152 million children in child labour, 72 million of which are in hazardous work. These children are now at even greater risk of facing circumstances that are even more difficult and working longer hours.

The Panama Declaration on Ending Violence Against Children thumbnail

The Panama Declaration on Ending Violence Against Children

  • Published: January 31, 2018

Challenged by the global epidemic of violence against children, we, leaders and members of the world’s religious and spiritual traditions, girls and boys, women and men, from 70 countries, together with representatives of governments, the United Nations, and international and grassroots organizations, met in Panama City, Panama for the 5th Forum of the Global Network of Religions for Children (GNRC), from 9-11 May 2017.

Building upon the GNRC’s 17 years of service to the world’s children, we affirm the fundamental dignity of every boy and girl. We reaffirm the moral imperative to protect children from harm, as enshrined and protected in the teachings of all of the world’s religious and spiritual communities and in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and its optional protocols. We believe in the power of interfaith cooperation to transform the world.

We grieve the fact that half of the world’s children endure physical, psychological or sexual violence. It is unacceptable that every five minutes, a child somewhere is killed in a violent act.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) thumbnail

The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

  • Published: November 19, 2019

Nearly 25 years ago, the world made a promise to children: that we would do everything in our power to protect and promote their rights to survive and thrive, to learn and grow, to make their voices heard and to reach their full potential.

This year, as we approach the 25th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), there is much to celebrate: from declining infant mortality, to rising school enrollment, to better opportunities for girls. In spite of the overall gains, there are many children who have fallen even further behind. Old challenges have combined with new problems to deprive many children of their rights and the benefits of development. To meet these challenges, and to reach those children who are hardest to reach, we need new ways of thinking and new ways of doing.